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Royal Rajasthan

"(पधारो म्हारे देश) Padharo Mhare Desh...!" Welcome to our state Rajasthan.

Rajasthan is a vibrant, exotic state where tradition and royal glory meet in a riot of colours against the vast backdrop of sand and desert. The word Rajasthan literally means the land of the Rajasthan. Its history is woven with tales of Courage, chivalry, friendship, loyalty and romance. The history of Rajasthan is also dotted with courtly intrigue and interstate warfare. It has an unusual diversity in its entire forms- people, customs, culture, costumes, music, manners, dialects, cuisine and physiographic. It's a Magical land that springs surprises at every turn, takes your breath away at every bend. In Rajasthan, cities sprang up around citadel. They still retain their medieval flavour with forts and palaces, with havelis for people to stay, with temple and mosque for people to pray. The land is endowed with invincible forts, magnificent palace havelis, rich culture and heritage, beauty and natural resources. It is a land rich in music, Dance, Art & Craft and Adventure, a land that never ceases to intrigue & enchant. There is a haunting air of romance, about the state, which is palpable in its every nook and corner. This abode of kings is one of the most exotic locales for tourist world over. The state has not only survived in all its ethnicity but owes its charisma and colour to its enduring traditional way of life.

Area3,42,239 sq km
CapitalJaipur
Population56,473,122
Official LanguagesRajasthani, Hindi
Boundary

Rajasthan is surrounded by western Pakistan, Madhya Pradesh, southeast, southwest on Rajasthan Gujarat, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh in the north-east, north and Punjab.

  • Rajasthan In India Is A Colourful Desert. The Unconvincing Thar Desert Of Rajasthan And With It All The Barren Land Of Rajasthan In India Has Much To Offer Through The Plethora Of Celebrations. Festivals And Fairs Of Rajasthan In India With All The Music And Dances Turn The Land To A Creative Fertile Basin. Rajasthan Is A Vibrant, Exotic State In India Where Tradition And Royal Glory Meet In A Riot Of Colors Against The Vast Backdrop Of Sand And Desert. Referred As The "desert Jewel Of India", Rajasthan Shimmers With Even More Vibrancy During The Time Of Its Colourful Fairs And Festivals. The Desert Glitters With The Colors Of Joyous Celebration And Gay Abandon With Every Fair And Festival Of Rajasthan In India. There Is A Celebration For Every Religious Occasion, Every Change Of Season And Every Harvest, All Invariably A Reflection Of The Genius Of Their Arts And Crafts And Their Ascetic Refinement.

    These Festivals Of Rajasthan Born Out Of Age-old Traditions, Adorns The Golden Land And Unveils The Best With Vulnerable Colours. The Festive Colours Of Rajasthan Are Alive And Unrestricted And Unify Each Soul Who Visits This Magic Land Of Rajasthan In India. There's A Rhythm, There's A Jest, A Passion, A Spirit Of Romance, Valour And A Feel Of Being One With The Blonde Landscape. This Spirit Of Celebration Is Like Desert Rains, Hidden In The Aravalli Bosom, Unfolding Its Feather With Each Festival. Rajasthan Is Known As The Most Vibrant, Colorful And Culturally Rich State Of India. The Vibrant And Lively People Of Rajasthan Are Famous For Their Passion For Colorful Costumes, Dance, Music And Various Festivals. In Fact, The True Color Of Rajasthan Can Best Be Seen In The Colorful And Passionate Celebration Of Various Festival And Fairs, All Round The Year. Each Region Has Their Own Form Of Folk Entertainment, Own Traditions, Own Dialect Adding To The Indian Diversity. Be It Men Or Women, Young Or Old, Everyone Wear New And Colorful Costumes. Various Colorful Cultural Programs Of Folk Dance And Music Add To The Charm Of These Fairs And Festivals. Folk Dances, Folk Music, Puppet Shows, Buying And Selling Of Cattle, Cock Fights, Bull Fights, Camel Races, Colorful Clothes And All The Other Paraphernalia Associated With Rural Festivals Can Be Seen At The Massive Annual Gatherings That Mark These Fairs And Festivals In Different Parts Of Rajasthan, India.

The Thar Is Known For Being The Most Colourful Desert In The World. A Spirit Of Celebration Permeates The Very Air Of This Province. Reflected In Rajasthan's Colourful Streets And In The Costumes Of Its People Is The Spirit Of Joie De Vivre. Over Centuries Rajasthan Has Hosted Varied Civilizations, Each Bringing Its Distinct Flavour To This Cultural Melting Pot. Settlers Ranging From Ancient Indus Valley Urbanites To Pastoral Aryan Herdsmen, Bhil Forest Dwellers, Jain Merchant Princes, Jat And Gujjar Cultivators, Muslim Craftsmen, And The Rajput Warrior Aristocracy. All Shaped This Region Called The Land Of Kings. Dance, Music, Celebration, Fanfare, Festivals, Art And Aesthetics Relieve The Tedium Of Coping With This Harsh And Demanding Land. Travel To Rajasthan, Savor Its Splendors, Imbibe Its Enviable Heritage And Immerse Yourself In It

Rajasthan Has A Rich Tradition Of Cuisines - For This Land Of Princes Had Some Of The Finest Cooks In The Palaces. The Common-folk Also Took Epicurean Delight In The Culinary Art. Aptly Has It Been Said That The Royal Kitchens Of Rajasthan Raised The Preparation Of Food To The Level Of A Sublime Art. It Is Not Surprising Therefore That The 'khansamas' (the Royal Cooks) Who Worked In The State Palaces Kept Their Most Prized Recipes To Themselves. Some Recipes Were Passed On To Their Descendants And The Rest Were Passed On As Skills To The Chefs Of Semi States And The Branded Hotel Companies.

One Special Feature Of The Rajasthani Cooking Is That It Has Its Roots In The Lifestyle Of The Medieval Rajasthan When The Chieftains Were Mainly At War. The Focus Was On Edible Items That Could Last For Several Days And Could Also Be Eaten Without Heating. Food Was Also Prepared Out Of Necessity Rather Than Choice. It Depended On The Items Available In Particular Regions. Furthermore, The Scarcity Of Water As Well As Fresh Green Vegetables Have Had Some Impact On Their Art Of Cooking.

In The Desert Belt Of Jaisalmer, Barmer And Bikaner, Cooks Use A Minimum Of Water And Prefer, Instead, To Use More Milk, Buttermilk And Clarified Butter. A Distinct Feature Of The Maheshwari (a Trading Company) Cooking Is The Use Of Mango Powder, A Suitable Substitute For Tomatoes, Scarce In The Desert, And Asafetida, To Enhance The Taste In The Absence Of Garlic And Onions.

One Always Ends Up Licking His Fingers. Each Region Is Distinguished By Its Popular Sweet - Mawa Kachori From Jodhpur, Alwar Ka Mawa, Malpuas Of Pushkar, Rasogullas Of Bikaner, Jaipur Ghevar Just To Name A Few. Your Tummy Will Scream "no More!" But You Won't Stop!!!

  • Rajasthan Has Blended Its Reach And Colourful Age-old Traditional Textile Industry With The Latest Technology Savvy Textile Industry. Textile Industry Of Rajasthan Has Presence Across Entire Textile Value Chain - From Spinning To Garments And Made-ups. Bhilwara Is The Biggest Centre For Production Of Viscous And Polyester Textiles In India. Almost Half Of The India's Pv Suitings And Yarn Is Contributed By Rajasthan. Pali, Balotra & Jodhpur Are The Renowned Locations In The Country For Processing, Dyeing And Of Low Weight - Low Cost Fabric. Jaipur Has Earned Name For Export Of Fashion Garments. Rajasthan Is A Major Producer Of Printed And Died Fabric For Fashion Garment Industry And Rajasthani Prints Of Bagru And Sanganer Have Got International Recognition. Khadi And Hand Woven Kota Doria Is Also Gaining Popularity Among Fashion Designers. Made Ups And Textile Handicrafts Products Of Rajasthan Have Found Market Across The Globe. More Than 2000 Garment / Textile Handicrafts Including Made Ups Units Are Operational In Rajasthan.

Settled in the rugged hills of the Aravalis, Jaipur is the pristine jewel in the desert sands of Rajasthan. Jaipur is as remarkable for its marvellous architecture and town planning as it is for the lively spirit of the people who inhabit it. The city presents a unique synthesis of culture that has to be experienced in order to be appreciated.
 
With its origin buried deep into the pages of history, the city still exudes a magical old world charm; an aroma of chivalry and romance is evident, despite having evolved into a city that is the hub of modern commercial activity in the region. Tell-tale signs of the glorious past and regal splendour of the city lie strewn across with gay abandon.
 
Widely known as the "Pink City", Jaipur is colour washed pink to welcome Prince Albert, the consort of Queen Victoria of England who visited India in 1883 A.D. The city was founded in 1727 A.D by one of the greatest ruler Jai Singh II. Jaipur is surrounded by hills on three sides, crowned by formidable forts and majestic palaces, mansions and gardens. Jaipur is the only city in the world, which is sub-divided in to nine rectangular sectors symbolizing nine divisions of universe. Jaipur is the first planned city designed in accordance with "Shilpa Shastra"- epochal treatise of Hindu architecture.
 
The lively spirit of fanfare, festivity and celebration of the people adequately match the colourful and intricately carved monuments. Even today, one can find weather beaten faces with huge colourful turbans, fierce moustaches and lips that spontaneously crease into a heart-warming smile. A city like Jaipur, where modernity and tradition live hand-in-hand, is truly rare. Perhaps this is what makes it an attractive destination for tourists who flock to Jaipur, year after year.
 
General Information
Altitude: 236.53 meters
Climate:Max.Min.
Summer 42.20C36.60C
Winter 27.50C15.50C
Rainfall: 31.87 cm
Clothing: Summer light tropical or cotton Winter Woollens
Best Season: October to March.
 
TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION
 
Air: Well linked with major cities of India.
 
Rail: Well connected with major towns.
 
Road: 
 
Delhi- 258 kmUdaipur- 405 km Bharatpur- 176 km
 
Agra- 236 km Ajmer- 131 kmJaisalmer- 638 km
 
Bikaner- 321 km Jodhpur- 316 kmBombay- 1202 km.
 
FAIRS & FESTIVALS
 
ELEPHANT FESTIVAL (MAR) -- The Elephant Festival is an inimitable event held annually in Jaipur. Groomed flawlessly, rows of elephants do a catwalk before an enthralled audience liked best fashion models to make this festival an amazing one.
 
GANGAUR FESTIVAL (MAR-APR) -- The Gangaur Festival is the colourful and most important local festival of Rajasthan and is observed throughout the State with great fervour and devotion by womenfolk who worship Gauri, the consort of Lord Shiva during July-Aug. It is the celebration of monsoon, harvest and marital fidelity in Jaipur. Gan is a synonym for Shiva and Gaur, which stands for Gauri or Parvati who symbolises saubhagya (marital bliss). Gauri is the embodiment of perfection and conjugal love which is why the unmarried women worship her for being blessed with good husbands, while married women do so for the welfare, health and long life of their spouses and a happy married life.
 
TEEJ FESTIVAL (AUG) -- Teej is the festival of swings. It marks the advent of the monsoon month of Shravan (August). The monsoon rains fall on the parched land and the pleasing scent of the wet soil rises into the air. Swings are hung from trees and decorated with flowers. Young girls and women dressed in green clothes sing songs in celebration of the advent of the monsoon. This festival is dedicated to the Goddess Parvati, commemorating her union with Lord Shiva.
 
KITE FESTIVAL, JAIPUR -- From royal splendour to riotous egalitarianism , 14 January is celebrated in India as Makar Sankranti - heralding the transition of the sun into the Northern hemisphere. In Jaipur Kites virtually blot out the sky. Everyone joins in this riotous celebration and shouts of "Woh Kata Hai!" reverberate from rooftops to the accompaniment of drums as adversary"s kites are cut down.
 
Jaipur Excursions 
 
Amber Fort -- Amber (pronounced Amer) is situated about 11 kilometres from Jaipur and was the ancient citadel of the ruling Kachhawa clan of Amber, before the capital was shifted in the plains to present day Jaipur. Amber is the classic and romantic fort- palace with a magnificent aura. The interior wall of the palace depicts expressive painting scenes with carvings, precious stones and mirror settings. In the foreground is the Maota Lake providing a breathtaking look.
 
Jaigarh Fort -- The Jaigarh fort is the most spectacular of the three-hilltop forts that overlook Jaipur. In Mughal times, the Jaipur region was a major weapon-producing centre for the Mughal and Rajput rulers, several of which are on display in the fort"s museum. 
 
Nahargarh Fort -- Nahargarh Fort is located on the sheer rugged ridge of Aravali Hills and it forms an impressive northern backdrop of Jaipur. It looks most classy when floodlit at night. The fort overlooks the city and presents a glittering view of the city lights. It was built in 1734 and extended in 1868. Nahargarh meaning abode of the tigers was built by Jai Singh to bolster the defence of Amber. 
 
Sanganer- 16 km -- Sanganer is located 16 Kms from Jaipur. It is also known for exquisite Jain temples. Moreover, it is an important centre for crafts and hand-printed textiles that is internationally famous.The most beautiful temple in Sanganer is the ancient Shri Digamber Jain temple. 
 
Tonk -- It is located, 96 kms away from Jaipur. This is a quiet town which was ruled by tribes of "Pathans" from Afghanistan. The focal point of Tonk is the Suneri Kothi, the Golden Bungalow. A fairly ordinary monument from outside, it has stunningly rich ornamental interiors. 
 
Bagru -- It is located 30 kms away from Jaipur on the Ajmer Road and is well known for its Bagru prints. This technique simulates a wooden block on which the required design is first carved, then the carved block is used for transferring the motif in the desired colour on the fabric. 
 
Samod -- The fort is an old fortified residence of the Nathawat family (hailing from chomu) that served as the Prime Ministers of the Jaipur Royal Court is located some 40km from Jaipur and 264 km from Delhi in the range of Aravali. 
 
Abhaneri -- Abhaneri is a village about 95 kms from Jaipur on the Jaipur-Agra Road. A detour is well merited for its amazing step wells or "baoris" and Harshat Mata Temple. According to a legend, the village is so called because the Goddess Harshat Mata who is shown portrayed in a joyous mood is believed to spread brightness or "abha" all around. The village"s original name was Abha Nagri, and its name today is Abhaneri. 
 
Kaurali -- Located at 182 kms southwest of Jaipur, it was founded in 1348 and is best known for its Krishna Temples. The Fort, which was constructed over different period, is about 600 years old.The Bhawar Vilas Palace, which is owned by the descendents of the royal family and resembles a large manor, is a hotel now. 
 
Ranthambore National Park-- Ranthambhor National Park, before a princely game conserve is the scene where the celebrated Indian Tiger is best seen. Ranthambhor Tiger Reserve lies on the junction of Aravali and Vindhyas just 14 Kms from Sawai Madhopur in Eastern Rajasthan. A significant geological feature within the park is the "Great Boundary Fault" where the Vindhaya plateau meets the Aravali range. The Rivers Chambal in the South and the Banas in the North bound the National Park. 
 
Sariska Tiger reserve-- This park is situated only 200 km from Delhi and 107 kms from Jaipur. Although larger than Ranthambor, it is less commercialised and has less tigers but a similar topography.In morning and evening, wildlife in Sariska heads towards the many water holes, which litter the park, thus providing the guests with their best chance of viewing game. 
 
Shekhawati- 168 km
 
Rising from the heart of the Thar Desert like a golden mirage is the city of Jaisalmer. A commanding fort etched in yellow sandstone stands with all its awesome splendours, dominating the amber-hued city.
 
The city has an interesting legend associated with it, according to which, lord Krishna- the head of Yadav clan foretold Arjuna that a remote descendent of the Yadav clan would build his kingdom atop the Trikuta Hill, His prophecy was fulfilled in 1156 AD. When Rawal Jaisal, a Bhatti Rajput abandoned his fort at Lodurva and founded a new capital Jaisalmer, perched on the Trikuta Hill Bhatti Rajputs of Jaisalmer were feudal chief who lived off the forced levy on the caravans laden with precious silks and spices that crossed the territory enroute Delhi-or Sind. These seems to be straight out of the "Tales of the Arabian Night " still enchants.
 
The life within the citadel conjures up images of medieval majesty visible in its narrow lanes strewn with magnificent palaces, havelis, temples and of course skilled artisans and ubiquitous camels. The setting turn Jaisalmer into a beautiful golden brown is a spectacular sight.
 
The perfect time to visit the golden city is during the Desert Festival held in Jan/Feb. every year, when the city reverberates to the sound of melodious tunes and rhythms. Folk dances, exciting competitions and contest, especially the turban-tying contest.
 
Mr. Desert contest and camel races enliven the festivals colourful craft bazaars are set up for the occasion and a sound and light spectacle is organized with folk artistes performing against the splendid backdrop of the famous sam sand dunes on the full moon night. Surely a not-to-be-missed events.
 
Every house, here, is exquisitely carved, having filigreed work all over. These houses date back to 12th - 15th century. And hence Jaisalmer is called "the Museum city".
 
General Information
Altitude: 225 meters
Climate:Extremely hot summers with maximum temperature touching 47 deg C.
Cold winters - min 1 deg C
Rainfall: 30 cm
Clothing: Summer Tropical, Winter Woollen
Best Season:  July to March
 
 
TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION
 
Air: The nearest airport is Jodhpur- 285 km.
 
Rail: Jaisalmer is connected with Jodhpur by night train service.
 
Road: 
 
Jodhpur- 285 km Barmer- 153 km
 
Bikaner- 325 km Delhi- 897 km
 
Pokhran- 112 km Jaipur- 638 km.
 
Jaisalmer
 
PLACE OF INTEREST
 
Golden Fort with 99 bastions -- Known as SONAR QUILA or the Golden fort, rising from the sand, the mega structure merges with the golden hues of the desert ambience and the setting suns in its most colourful shades gives it a fairy tale look. Its simply a magic. The bastions envelop a whole township that consists of palace complex various security sources and the Havelis of rich merchants. 
 
Salim Sing Ki Haveli -- This Haveli was built about 300 years ago and a part of it is still occupied. Salim Singh was the prime minister when Jaisalmer was the capital of the princely state and his mansion has a beautifully arched roof with superb carved brackets in the form of Peacocks. 
 
Patwon ki Haveli -- This is one of the largest and most elaborate Haveli in Jaisalmer and stands in a narrow lane. It is five storeys high and is extensively carved. It is divided into six apartments, two owned by archaeological Survey of India, two by families who operate craft-shops and two private homes. There are remnants of paintings on some of the inside walls as well as some mirror work. 
 
Nathumal ki Haveli -- Two architect brothers built it in the 19th century. Interestingly, while one concentrated on the right, the other concentrated on the left and the result is a symphony epitomising the side-by-side symmetry during construction. Paintings in miniature style monopolise the walls in the interior. Mighty tuskers carved out of yellow sandstone stand guard to the Haveli. 
 
TaziaTower -- The delicate pagoda like Tazia Tower rises from Badal Mahal (Cloud Palace). Rising in its five-tiered splendour, with each storey graced by a delicately carved balcony, the tower is of historical significance. Muslim craftsmen built it in the shape of a Tazia and gifted it to their royal patron. 
 
Mool Sagar -- On way to Sam Sand Dunes, is another natural point. Lake, Garden, summer palaces constructed by Maharawal Mool Raj in 18th Century. 
 
Gadisar Lake -- This tank, south of the city walls, once held the town water supply, and befitting its importance in providing precious water to the inhabitants of this arid city, it is surrounded by small temples and shrines. The beautiful yellow sandstone gateway arching across the road down to the tank is the Tilon-ki-Pol, built by a famous prostitute, Tilon. When she offered to pay to have this gateway constructed, the Maharaja refused permission under it to go down to the tank and he felt that this would be beneath his dignity. While he was away, she built the gate, adding a Krishna temple on top so that king could not tear it down. 
 
Gyan Bhandar a library founded in 1500 A.D. by Acharya Maharaj Jin Bhadra Suri. This small underground vault houses priceless ancient illustrated manuscripts, some dating from the 11th century. Other exhibits include astrological charts and the Jain version of the Shroud of Turin: the Shroud of Gindhasuri, a Jain hermit and holy man who died in Ajmer. In a small locked cabinet are the images of Parasnath made of ivory and various precious stones including emerald and crystal. There are plans to shift the library outside the present location within the Jain temple so it can be visited.
 
Jaisalmer Excursions
 
Pokhran -- It is located on the junction of Jodhpur, Jaisalmer and Bikaner Road. It is on route to Jaisalmer and is also a fort town though the fort is not of the dimensions of Jaisalmer or Jodhpur. Pokhran also came into limelight, as it was the site for India nuclear detonation. Pokhran is also renowned for its furniture and interior crafts. The Fort locate about 1.5 km from the bus stand has an assortment of weaponry, brocade clothes and various games of dice and dominoes on display.
 
Lodurwa Jain Temple - 16 km -- Northwest from Jaisalmer, Ludurwa is the ancient capital of Jaisalmer now a silent city, the only witnesses to its former splendour are the jain temple, toran (ornate arche) & artificial divine tree (Kalptaroo) are the main attraction here. Ruins of the deserted capital still remind the famous love legend of Moomal-Mahendra. 
 
Amar Sagar - on way to Ludurwa the natural spot developed by Maharawal Amar Singh is a water reservoir in 1688 AD. The dams were constructed to hold rainwater. Several terraces are formed where summer palaces, temples are constructed & Garden developed. On the south of the lake stands the exquisitely carved Jain temple constructed by Himmat Ram Bafna, the descendant of famous patwas. 
 
Ramdeora - 150 km -- Ramdeora fair is held every year for ten days in August-September to pay homage to the fifteenth century saint, Shri Ramdeoji. Ramdeora village lies about 13 km from Pokaran, headquarters of a sub-division in Jaisalmer district. 
 
Sam Sand Dunes- 42 km -- Sam Sand Dunes, 42 away km from Jaisalmer, is the most popular excursion to see the total sandy bush less desert. It has a truly glorious stretch of sweeping sand dunes. It is best to be here at sunrise or sunset, and many camel safaris spend a night at the dunes. The best way to see this and other sights around Jaisalmer is to take a came safari. The standard trip lasts for 4 days and three nights, and offers the opportunity to explore the area in authentic and leisurely fashion. 
 
Kuldhara & Khabha: - (Medieval Deserted village of Paliwal Brahmins) The total number of 84 villages were abandoned by Paliwal Brahmins overnight, out of that two most prominent villages are Kuldhara & Khabha located about 18 to 30 km South West of Jaisalmer and Kuldhara 5 km of the same road. The ruins of Kuldhara & Khabha exhibit the architectural, excellence of those times, which was buried under dunes till recently. 
 
Bada Bagh - 6 km -- Situated on the north of Jaisalmer on way to Ramgarh. Royal cenotaphs with carved images of past Maharawals & their families. Each chhatris preserve inscribed tablet recording the death of Maharawals in which the memorials are raised. The chhatris have been built on a set-pattern but in different sizes. The beautiful spot jait bundh (Dame) & Lake after Maharawal Jait Singh was constructed in 1513 AD. Attached to bundh (Dame), on other side is garden of mangoes and other fruits. 
 
Barmer- 153 km -- Barmer is a desert town just 153 kms from Jaisalmer and has fortresses to boast off. This place is primarily famous for its woodcarving, furniture and interiors, carpets, block printing and embroideries. The centre for embroidery is the Sadar Bazaar and woodcarvings are around the Station Road. It has an RTDC Hotel and private Hotels too. 
 
Wood Fossil Park - 17 km -- Just 17 km from Jaisalmer and a kilometre away from the Barmer Road are fossilised remains of 180 million-year-old forests. These are beautiful forest vistas and any forester around can show you. There is a ticket to visit the Park for foreigners Rs.20 and locals Rs.5 plus Rs.10 for vehicle. 
 
Desert National Park - 40 km -- The Desert National Park is an excellent example of the ecosystem of the Thar Desert and its rich fauna. The Sudashri forest post is the most ideal place for observing wildlife in the Desert National Park. Sand dunes form less than 20 percent of the Park, which consists of craggy rocks, pavements and compact salt lake bottoms, intermediary areas and fixed dunes. 
Bikaner- the royal fortified city, stands on a slightly raised ground, and is circumscribed by a 7 km long embattled wall with five gates. The magnificent forts and palaces created with delicacy in reddish-pink sandstone bears testimony to its rich cultural heritage. Bikaner, more popularly called the camel country is renowned for the best riding camels in the world.
 
General Information
Area: 18 sq. km
Altitude: 237 meters
Climate:Max.Min.
Summer 41.80C280C
Winter23.20C100C
Best Season: October to March
 
 
TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION
 
Air Nearest Airport is Jodhpur 253 km connected by Indian Airlines .
 
Rail: Bikaner is connected with Delhi, Jaipur, Jodhpur, Jammu Tawi & Haridwar.
 
 
Road: Good motorable roads connect Bikaner with Delhi 510 km, Jaipur 316 km, Jodhpur 240 km and Jaisalmer 335 km and Pushkar 246 km..
 
LOCAL TRANSPORT
 
Auto Rickshaws, Tonga"s and Un-metered Taxis available.
 
FESTIVALS
 
Camel Festival: The festival brings to life the desert town to full life with its spell binding display of the desert life. Various camel contests are also held.
 
Karni Mata Fair: Is celebrated twice a year at the Deshnok during the Navratras in April/ May & Oct/ Nov.
 
Gangaur: Begins a day after the Holi is 18 days long festival.
 
Kapil Muni Fair, Kolayat: On the full moon day of the month of Kartik the sacred lake of Kolayat becomes the venue of the fair held in the honour of Kapil Muni. A cattle fair also collaborate the event.
 
PLACES OF INTEREST
 
Junagarh Fort -- The Junagarh Fort, built by Rai Singh between 1588 and 1593, has a 986-metre-long wall with 37 bastions, a moat and two entrances. Situated at a height of above seven hundred feet above sea level, it towers over the city and can be seen from a distance. The fort and its palaces are profusely decorated with magnificent stone carvings. The major buildings within the fort include the Anup Mahal, Diwan-e-Khas, Hawa Mahal, Badal Mahal, Chandra Mahal, Phool Mahal, Rang Mahal, Dungar Mahal, and Ganga Mahal. The Chandra Mahal has remarkable frescoes. Beautiful mirror work adorns the walls of Phool Mahal while golden pen work decorates the Anup Mahal.
 
 
Lalgarh Palace -- Built by Maharaja Ganga Singh in memory of his father, the Lalgarh Palace is situated 3 km north of Bikaner city. Designed by Sir Swinton Jacob, the palace is quite imposing with overhanging balconies and delicate latticework. Peacocks and blooming bougainvillea in the garden welcome the visitor to the palace. To promote tourism, the Rajasthan Tourism Development Corporation has converted a portion of this palace into a hotel.
 
 
Ganga Golden Jubilee Museum -- One of the best museums in Rajasthan, the Ganga Golden Jubilee Museum has one of the richest collections of terracotta ware, weapons, miniature paintings of Bikaner school and coins dating back to Harappan civilization and Gupta and Kushan era. 
 
 
Raj Ratan Bihari and Rasik Shiromani Temple -- These temples are situated inside the Ratan Bihari Park on the northern side of KEM road. Built in early 19th cent by Ratan Singuji and Sardar Singuji. They are of red sandstone and constructed in a mansion style of architecture.
A valiant sentinel in the desert, on the eastern fringe of the Thar Desert has the distinction of neither being a part of the Thar Desert nor out of it. At best it is a doorway to the wonderland of sand dunes and shrubs, rocky terrain and thorny trees. It is the home of the Rathors - the awesome princely state of Rajasthan, who conquered Marwar or Maroodesh, land of the sand after the fall of Delhi and Kannauj.
 
In 1459 AD, Rao Jodha, chief of Rathore clan of Rajputs, who claimed descent from Rama, the epic here of the Ramayana, laid the foundation of Jodhpur. A high stonewall protects the well-fortified city. The wall is nearly 10 km in length and has eight gates facing various directions.
 
Within, stands an imposing fort on a low range of sandstone hills, about 125m above the surrounding plains. Invincible! And dauntless in its league with time! The city lies at the foot of the hills. The clear distinction between the old and the new city is visible from the ramparts of the fort.
 
On the other side of the city, facing the fort is the Umaid Bhawan Palace, one of the most spacious, sprawling and well-planned palaces in India. And from here, as you look at the fort, a tantalizing view rises before your eyes at sunset.
 
The peculiar slant of the sunset lends the desert landscape an awe-inspiring glow and the people, a chivalry undaunted.
 
General Information
Climate:Summer : Max 42.2 degree C to min 36.6 degree C
Winter : Max 27.5 degree C to min 15.5 degree C
Rainfall: 31.87
Clothing: Summer Tropical, Winter Woollen
Best Season: October to February
 
TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION
 
Air Well linked with major cities of India
 
Rail: Well connected with major towns.
 
Road:Agra- 577 km, 
 
Agra- 577 km,  Delhi- 592 km Udaipur - 275 km
 
Ajmer- 198 km Jaipur- 343 kmRanakpur - 175 km
 
Barmer- 220 km Jaisalmer- 290 km
 
Bikaner- 240 km Mount Abu- 264 km
 
Bombay- 1073 km
NAGAUR FAIR (JAN-FEB)
 
This eight days fair held every year during the month of Jan-Feb, is popularly known as the Cattle fair and is the second largest in Rajasthan. Nagaur Town is the most picturesque of Rajput townships. Nagaur is a sea of animals, trading over 70,000 bullocks, camels and horses every year.
 
PLACES OF INTEREST
 
 
Umaid Bhawan Palace -- Maharaja Umaid Singhji who built this palace was fascinated with western lifestyles so he marshalled the services of a well-known Edwardian architect, Henry Vaughan Lanchester, a creditable equal of Edward Lutyens (architect of New Delhi) to construct a three hundred and forty seven roomed Umaid Palace. This was to become India last of the great palaces and the biggest private residence in the world.
 
 
Jaswant Thada -- On the way down from the fort, on left is Jaswant Thada, the graceful marble cenotaph of Maharaja Jaswant Singh II. His son Maharaja Sardar Singhji built the Taj Mahal of Marwar in the memory of Maharaj Jaswant Singhji II of Jodhpur.
 
 
Maha Mandir-- The Mahamandir Temple is supported by 100 pillars and has carvings depicting yoga postures.
 
 
Mandore Gardens -- Mandore was the former capital of Maharajas of Marwar and is located about 5 miles north of Jodhpur, but was later abandoned for the security of Mehrangarh fort. Here you will find the dewals, or cenotaphs of Jodhpur"s former rulers. Unlike the usual chhatri-shaped cenotaphs typical of Rajasthan, they were built along the lines of a Hindu temple, four stories high, with fine columns and an elegant spire, all in red sandstone.
 
 
Balsamand Lake and Palace -- An artificial lake with a summer palace on the embankment.
Clock Tower and Sardar Market
Girdikot 
Bishnoi Tribal Village where deer"s are held sacred. 
 
EXCURSIONS
 
 
Guda Bishnoi- 25 km -- It is the nearest point form Jodhpur to exotic wild life & nature. During the session thousands of birds can be seen here, like domicile Cranes etc. This pond is water-drinking point for the antelopes and black bucks of near by area.
 
 
Ossianji Temple- 65 km -- The ancient town of Thar Desert was a great trading center between 8th to 12th centuries. Today it is desert oasis with 16 Brahamanical and Jain temples, beautifully sculpted and designed, most of which have stood ravages of time. The place is highlighted by its camel ride at the time of the sunset.
 
 
Sardar Samand Lake and Palace- 55 km -- A shimmering lake and palace with interesting villages and lively people to be seen and photographed en route. 
 
 
Nagaur-- The Ahhichatragarh Fort is medium sized, which have been built by Mughal Emperors Akbar and Shaha Jahan. A well planned Mughal Garden, which retains its pleasant appearance even today. The city has distinct Muslim influences and a Five Domed Mosque built by Emperor Akbar dominates the landscape. The city is best visited during the Ramdeoji Ka mela and Tejaji ka mela in February and August respectively. Nagaur is approachable by express busses of RSRTC and by taxi.
 
South west of Jaipur, Ajmer is an oasis wrapped in the green hills. The city was founded by Raja Ajay Pal Chauhan in the 7th Century A.D. and continued to be a major centre of the Chauhan power till 1193 A.D. When Prithviraj Chauhan lost it to Mohammed Ghauri. Since then, Ajmer became home to many dynasties. Today, Ajmer is a popular pilgrimage centre for the Hindus as well as Muslims. Especially famous is the Dargah Sharif-tomb of the Sufi saint Khwaja Moinuddin Chisti, which is equally revered by the Hindus and Muslims. It is a centre of culture and education, the British chose Ajmer for its prestigious Mayo College a school exclusively for Indian nobility. Ajmer is also the base for visiting Pushkar (11 km.), the abode of Lord Brahma, lying to its west with a temple and a picturesque lake. The Pushkar Lake is a sacred spot for Hindus. During the month of Kartik (Oct./Nov.), devotes throng in large numbers here to take a dip in the sacred lake.
 
Ajaipal Chauhan founded Ajmer in the seventh century. He constructed a hill fort "Ajaimeur" or the invincible hill. The Chauhans ruled Ajmer till the 12th century when Prithviraj Chauhan lost Mohammed Ghauri. Thereafter it became a part of the sultanate of Delhi. Ajmer was also favourite residence for the great Mughals. One of the first contacts between the Mughal King Jahangir and Sir Thomas Roe took place here in 1616. The Scindias took over the city in 1818 and then handed it over to the British and it became one of the only part of Rajasthan controlled directly by the East Indian Co.
 
The bus stand in Ajmer is located near the RTDC hotel Khadim. And the railway is further north and most of the hotels are west of the stations. Northeast is the main post office and most of the cities market is located behind and up to Agra Gate. Further north is a large artificial lake called the Anna Sagar.
 
General Information
Altitude: 486 meters
Climate:Max.Min.
Summer 43.70C23.30C
Winter 37.70C05.50C
 
Rainfall: 38 to 57 cm
Best Season: September to April
 
Road: Ajmer is well connected by road to Agra (360 km)
Bharatpur (306 km) Delhi (391 km)
Jaipur (138 km) Bikaner (282 km)
Bundi (165 km) Chittaurgarh (191 km)
Jodhpur (208 km) Jaisalmer (503 km)
Kota (205 km)Udaipur (292 km)
Mount Abu (371 km)
 
PLACE OF INTEREST
 
Adhai Din Ka Jhonpra -- A remarkable structure, this is a masterpiece of Indo Islamic architecture located on the outskirts of the city. Just beyond the Dargah. As the legend goes, its construction took two and a half days (Adhai-Din) to complete. It was originally a Sanskrit college, built within a temple. In 1193 A.D. Mohammad Ghauri conquered Ajmer and converted the building into a mosque by adding a seven arched wall in front of the pillared hall in just two-and-a-half days (adhai-din) and hence the name. The district pillars and arched screen with its ruined minarets make it a splendid architectural masterpiece.
 
Ana Sagar Lake -- Located towards the north of Ajmer city this beautiful lake was built by Anaji during 1135-1150 A.D, by damming the river Luni. Later the Mughal emperors made additional constructions to beautify the lake. The "Baradari", Shah Jahan built a marble pavilion and the Daulat Bagh gardens were laid by Jehangir.
 
Dargah of Kwaja Moinuddin Chishti -- At the foot of a barren hill, is situated India"s most important Piligrimage centre for people from all faith. It is the splendid tomb of the Sufi saint Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti, more popularly known as Khwaja Sharif. The Khwaja left for heavenly abode in 1256 AD after a six day prayer in seclusion. These six days are celebrated every year as the annual Urs, which is attended by pilgrims irrespective of their faith. The shrine is considered to be a place of wish fulfilment for those who pray with devout and pure hearts. It is said that Emperor Akbar sought blessings for his son at the Dargah. The entry to the Dargah is through the Buland Darwaza that leads to the inner courtyard. The high gateway has beautifully carved silver doors. In the courtyard are kept two huge cauldrons with capacity of 2240 Kg and 4480 Kg. On special occasions, Kheer cooked in these cauldrons is distributed among the pilgrims. The grave of the Sufi Saint is surrounded by a silver railing and is partially covered with a marble screen. The daughter of Shah Jahan had built a prayer room in the Dargah for the women devotees. The primises of the Dargah also has the tomb of Bhishti, tomb of Saint"s daughter-Bili Hafiz Jama, tomb of Shah Jahan"s daughter Chimni Begum.
 
Mayo College -- One of Indian"s best public schools located in the south east of the city. It was founded in 1875 A.D. only for the princes. Each prince along with his entire retinue and an English tutor had his own house in the spacious college grounds covering 81 hectares. Now it is a public school open to all.
 
Soniji Ki Nasiyan -- Also famous as Lal Mandir, it consists of models of human development & Jain Purans engraved in main hall. Models of Ayodhya & the panch Kalyanak are present in he other part of the temple. This red coloured Jain temple was built in the late 19th century. The wooden gilt in the double storeyed hall depicts scenes from the Jain mythology. The beauty of this temple is widely acclaimed. Built in the year 1865 by Rai Bahadur seth Mool Chand Soni of Ajmer. The temple consists of two parts, the first portion is the worship area for Jain community where idol of Lord Adinath the first of the 24 tirthsnkars, of Jain religion is installed. The second portion is the museum section where the five stages (Panch Kalyanak) in the life of Lord Adinath have been depicted in the form of statues. The 40 x 80 feet hall is exquisitely done up in pure gold, Belgium stain glass, mineral colour paintings and stain glasswork. Thus this two-story museum is a treat to the Soul.
 
Taragarh Fort -- A steep one and half hour climb beyond the Adhai-Din-ka-Jhonpra leads to the ruins of the Taragarh Fort perched on a hill. One can have an excellent view of the city from here. The fort was the site of the military activity during the Mughal period later used as a sanatorium by the British.
 
The Museum -- Once the royal residence of Emperor Akbar, the museum houses a rich repository of the Mughal and Rajput armor and exquisite sculptures.
Chittaurgarh - The town of the brave, known for its massive fort atop a hill, which can be singled out for its glorious past.
 
The fort has checkered history, it has witnessed some of the bloodiest battles in history, three great Sakas and some of the most heroic deeds of valour, which are still sung by the local musicians. The antiquity of Chittaurgarh is difficult to trace, but it is believed that Bhim the legendary figure of the Mahabharta, visited this place to learn the secrets of immortality and became the disciple of a sage, but his impatience to perform all the rites deprived him of his goal, and out of sheer anger he stamped on ground creating water reservoir, this reservoir is called as Bhim Lat. Later on, it came under the Mauryas or Muri Rajputs, there are different opinions as to when ilt came under the Mewar ruler, but it remained the capital of Mewar till 1568, when it was shifted to Udaipur.
 
 
It is believed that Bappa Rawal the legendary founder of the Sisodia clan, received Chittaur in the middle of 8th century, as a part of the dowry after marriage with the last Solanki princess, after that his descendants ruled Mewar which stretched from Gujarat to Ajmer, upto the 16th century.
 
General Information
 
Population: 71566
Area: 7 sq.km.
Altitude: 408 meters
Climate:Max.Min.
Summer33.80C11.60C
Winter28.30C11.60C
 
Clothing: Summer Light Cottons, Winter Woollens
Best Season: Oct to March
Language: Rajasthani, Hindi & Gujarati
 
TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION
 
BUS SERVICE
 
RTDC buses connects Ajmer with Agra, Bikaner, Jaipur, Delhi, Jodhpur, Kota, Udaipur, Mount Abu, Chittaugarh, Bharatpur etc.
 
Location: 160 km from Udaipur, 130 km from Bundi and 40 km from Chittaurgarh.
 
Jaisalmer
 
PLACE OF INTEREST
 
Golden Fort with 99 bastions -- Known as SONAR QUILA or the Golden fort, rising from the sand, the mega structure merges with the golden hues of the desert ambience and the setting suns in its most colourful shades gives it a fairy tale look. Its simply a magic. The bastions envelop a whole township that consists of palace complex various security sources and the Havelis of rich merchants. 
 
Salim Sing Ki Haveli -- This Haveli was built about 300 years ago and a part of it is still occupied. Salim Singh was the prime minister when Jaisalmer was the capital of the princely state and his mansion has a beautifully arched roof with superb carved brackets in the form of Peacocks. 
 
Patwon ki Haveli -- This is one of the largest and most elaborate Haveli in Jaisalmer and stands in a narrow lane. It is five storeys high and is extensively carved. It is divided into six apartments, two owned by archaeological Survey of India, two by families who operate craft-shops and two private homes. There are remnants of paintings on some of the inside walls as well as some mirror work. 
 
Nathumal ki Haveli -- Two architect brothers built it in the 19th century. Interestingly, while one concentrated on the right, the other concentrated on the left and the result is a symphony epitomising the side-by-side symmetry during construction. Paintings in miniature style monopolise the walls in the interior. Mighty tuskers carved out of yellow sandstone stand guard to the Haveli. 
 
TaziaTower -- The delicate pagoda like Tazia Tower rises from Badal Mahal (Cloud Palace). Rising in its five-tiered splendour, with each storey graced by a delicately carved balcony, the tower is of historical significance. Muslim craftsmen built it in the shape of a Tazia and gifted it to their royal patron. 
 
Mool Sagar -- On way to Sam Sand Dunes, is another natural point. Lake, Garden, summer palaces constructed by Maharawal Mool Raj in 18th Century. 
 
Gadisar Lake -- This tank, south of the city walls, once held the town water supply, and befitting its importance in providing precious water to the inhabitants of this arid city, it is surrounded by small temples and shrines. The beautiful yellow sandstone gateway arching across the road down to the tank is the Tilon-ki-Pol, built by a famous prostitute, Tilon. When she offered to pay to have this gateway constructed, the Maharaja refused permission under it to go down to the tank and he felt that this would be beneath his dignity. While he was away, she built the gate, adding a Krishna temple on top so that king could not tear it down. 
 
Gyan Bhandar a library founded in 1500 A.D. by Acharya Maharaj Jin Bhadra Suri. This small underground vault houses priceless ancient illustrated manuscripts, some dating from the 11th century. Other exhibits include astrological charts and the Jain version of the Shroud of Turin: the Shroud of Gindhasuri, a Jain hermit and holy man who died in Ajmer. In a small locked cabinet are the images of Parasnath made of ivory and various precious stones including emerald and crystal. There are plans to shift the library outside the present location within the Jain temple so it can be visited.
 
At an altitude of 1220 meters crowning at the highest peak of the Aravali hills, Mount Abu is the only hill station of Rajasthan and one of the prettiest hill stations in the country. Mount Abu was dedicated to Lord Shiva before it became a Jain Pilgrimage Centre. The biggest draw for Mount Abu is the Dilwara Jain Temple for its carvings. The hill boasts of a rich vegetation and thick forest. It stands out like an oasis in arid environs. 
 
This "Hill of Wisdom" and a true " Olympus of Rajasthan" stands on an independent hillock, which is separated from the main Aravali ranges by a deep gorge. 
 
When ascending the mountain, one cannot, but be impressed with the grandeur and the scenic beauty, the gigantic blocks of rocks, towering along the crest of the hill, are especially striking, in some cases so weather- worn, that they present most fanciful and weird shapes, while in others appear so slightly balanced as to be in danger of rolling down. 
 
It is not only one of the prettiest hill stations in the country, but a major Rajput and Jain pilgrimage centre. The legend goes that a "yagna" was performed here and four Agnikula or fireborn Rajput clans- the Chauhans, Parmaras, Pratiharas and Solankis were created out of fire. Till 11th century, Mount Abu was an important Vaishnav and Shiva pilgrimage center, but now it has gained importance as a Jain pilgrim center
 
The hill boasts of rich vegetation and thick forest, it stands out as an oasis in the arid environs, it is pleasant climate picturesque setting invite thousands of tourists for pleasure trips and relaxation.
 
General Information
Population:15500
Area:25 sq. km
Temperature: Max.Min.
Summer 33.3 0C23.3 0C
Winter 23.3 0C 11.6 0C
Rainfall: 153 to 177 cm
Clothing: Summer Cottons, winter woolens
Languages: Gujarati, Hindi, and English
 
TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION
 
Air: Nearest airports are Udaipur and Ahmedabad.
 
Rail: Nearest railhead is Abu Road- 27 km.
 
Road:214- km, Bombay- 835 km, Delhi- 768 km, Jaipur- 515 km, Udaipur- 182 km, Jodhpur- 291 km, Ranakpur-168 km
 
Places of interest
 Adhar Devi Temple 
 Andhra Point (Honeymoon Point)
 
 Dilwara Jain Temple -- Mount Abu was an important Vaishnava and Shaivite pilgrim center up to the 11th century. Today, it is recognized the world over for it"s magnificent Jain temples. No visit to Abu can be complete without a trip to the famed Dilwara temples. These temples are the greatest draw of Abu, apart from its salubrious clime. Half hidden by mango groves their sober exterior belies the wealth of their interior ornamentation. Wondrously carved in marble, the Dilwara temples enshrine various Jain tirthankaras, saints. Built between the 11th and 13th century, are famous for their superb carvings in marble.
 
 
Gaumukh -- Many sages and sheers had their retreats on Mt. Abu, the most famous being sage Vashistha. To regenerate the human race, he performed a yagya or magic fire from which were born the agnikula clans of Chauhan, Solankis, Pannars and Pratihars. A natural spring that flows that through a sculpted cow"s head, gives the shrine its name.
 
 
Nakki Lake -- The lake is picturesquely set amidst hills and is believed to have been carved out by the Gods with their nails. It is popular spot for boating and the only artificial lake in India that is 1200 mts. above sea level. The surrounding hills have several area of interest.
 
 
Toad Rock -- Overhanging the Nakki Lake, so called because of its likeness to gigantic toad about to leap into the water
Red Temple
Shri Raghunathji Temple
 
 
Sunset Point -- It provides a lovely view of the setting sun, South-West of Nakki lake, where the sun gradually drowns itself in the azure sky between two mountain peaks, steps lead up to high terrace which offers an awe inspiring view of the setting sun.
 
 
Excursions: 
Ambaji- 50 km 
 
Achalgarh- 11 km -- Medieval monument of Mt Abu, is the Achalgadh fort commissioned by Rana Kumbha, who was responsible for dozens of gigantic fortresses in southern Rajasthan, with massive battlemented walls and a situation on a mountain peak offering great views. A steeply winding path leads up to the 15th century fortress and the temples within the fortified walls, great for a view of the countryside. 
 
 
Guru Shikar- 15 km -- The highest peak on the mount (1722 mts above the sea level) allows a bird eye view of the sylvan surroundings of Mount Abu.A small shrine and a temple of Dattatreya standing on the shikhar are worth a visit. 
 
 
Ranakpur -168 km 
 
 
Mount Abu Widlife sanctuary -- The sanctuary comprises the oldest mountain ranges - The Aravali. It was declared as a Wildlife Sanctuary in 1960. Apart from having several sightseeing places this sanctuary is a draw for nature lovers as it has great potential for Eco-tourism, in shape this sanctuary is long and narrow but the top spreads out into a picturesque plateau which is about 19 km. is length and 5-8 km. in breadth. Attitudinally it varies from 300m. at the foot Mil to 1722 m. at Gurushikhar, the highest peak of the Aravali Ranges. The rocks are igneous and due the weathering effect of wind and water, large cavities are common the rocks. This feature is typical of Aravali and particularly of Mt, Abu. Toad Rock in Mount Abu is one such example. 
Pushkar is 11 Kms from Ajmer, along the picturesque Pushkar Lake lies the tranquil town with the deep religious significance. "Nag Pahar" or Snake Mountain forms a natural boundary between Ajmer and Pushkar. The main Attraction is Pushkar Lake, The Lake with 52 Ghats and an array of temples along the banks is an important pilgrimage centre. 
 
Located just 11 kms from Ajmer, the holy lake of Pushkar is believed to have been created by Lord Brahma himself. It is as important as Benaras or Puri. Devout Hindus believe that it is essential to visit Pushkar at least once in their lifetime.
 
No pilgrimage is considered complete without a dip in the holy Pushkar Lake. Pushkar has as many as 400 temples and 52 ghats and the only temple in the country that is dedicated to Brahma is to be found here. While Pushkar is a heaven for the religiously inclined, it is also the venue of one of the country"s most colourful cattle fairs - the Pushkar Fair of Hindus.
 
History of Pushkar - RajasthanPushkar became a favorite residence of the great Mughals. One of the first contacts between the Mughals and the British occurred in Pushkar when Sir Thomas Roe met with Jehangir here in 1616. The city was subsequently taken by the Scindias and, in 1818, it was handed over to the British, becoming one of the few places in Rajasthan controlled directly by British rather than being part of a princely state.
 
General Information
Temperature: Max.Min.
Summer 45 0C-25 0C
Winter 220C -80C
Rainfall: Rainy Season from July to Mid Sept, and very humid (upto 90%).
Clothing: Summer Cottons, winter woolens
Languages:Gujarati, Hindi, and English, Rajasthani
 
TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION
 
Air: Nearest airports are Udaipur and Ahmedabad
 
Rail: Nearest railhead is Abu Road- 27 km. 
 
Road:214- km, Bombay- 835 km, Delhi- 768 km, Jaipur- 515 km, Udaipur- 182 km, Jodhpur- 291 km, Ranakpur-168 km
Festivals
 
Pushkar Fair -- Pushkar is world famous for its cattle fair normally held in the Hindu month Kartika, which is around Oct-November. At this time the town jam-packed with tribal people from all over Rajasthan and tourist. It is commonly known as Camel fair, bringing with them several camels and cattle to the pilgrimage. A Fair ground is fashioned and is packed with shops selling souvenirs and eateries. And villagers come sell camels, horses, elephants and cattle and other livestock. Elaborate arrangement for staying of visitors is made including luxury tents. Just don"t miss the Pushkar Fair if you are in India around that time.
 
PLACES OF INTEREST
 
 
FORTS & MONUMENTS
 
 
 Pushkar Lake -- The pious Pushkar Lake is believed to having been created by the falling of lotus from the hand of Lord Brahma. It is considered to be as old as the creation. The lake is considered as one of the most sacred spots, and believed that one dip in the waters of lake on Kartika Poornima ocassion is equivalent to performing yagnas for several hundred years. 
 
 
 Brahma Temple -- This is the only existing temple dedicated to lord Brahma and was constructed in the 14th century, standing on a high plinth with marble steps leading up to it. A beautiful carved silver turtle sits on the floor facing the sanctorum or Garbha Griha. The marble floor around the silver turtle is embedded with hundreds of silver coins, with donors name engraved on them
 
 
 Old Rangji Temple -- Lord Rangji is an carnation in of lord Vishnu. This temple was built in 1823 by Seth Puran Mal Ganeriwal of Hyderabad.This temple is unique due to confluence of South Indian style (Dravid) Rajput and Mughal style of architecture.
 
 
 New Temple -- The gracious temple is very conspicuous, due to its south Indian style of architecture. It has a high rising Gopuram typical of southern India Pushkar has more than 400 temples, the other important temples are Balaji la Mandir and Man Mandir.
 
 
 Savitri Temple -- The temple of Lord Brahma"s first wife. It is located on the hill behind the Brahma temple and one has to climb a long series of steps to reach the shrine. It commands a panoramic view of the beautiful lake and the picturesque surrounding of the villages.
 
 
 Saraswati Temple -- Saraswati is the wife of Brahma. Literally her name means "the flowing one" .In the Rig Veda she represents a river deity and is connected with fertility and purification. She is considered the personification of all knowledge - arts, sciences, crafts and skills. She is the goddess of the creative impulse, the source of music, beauty and eloquence.
 
EXCURSIONS
 
 
 Camel Safari -- There are quite a few people in Pushkar who operate horse or camel safaris. Camel safaris are a splendid way of taking in the sights and experiencing the rugged beauty of the desert. The camels may look aloof, but they are known as the lifeline for the desert people, whose major mode of transportation depends on camels only, also known as the "Ship of the desert".
On the banks of the shimmering lake Pichola, is one of the most romantic cities of Rajasthan. Nestled among the lush hills of the Aravalis, it has inevitably been dubbed the "Venice of the East". It is a kaleidoscope of fairy-tale palaces, lakes, temples, gardens and narrow lanes strewn with stalls, carries the flavour of the heroic past, epitomizing valor and chivalry.
 
Founded in 1568 A.D by Maharana Udai Singh, the city is a harmonious Indian blend of whitewashed buildings, marble palaces, lakeside gardens, temples and Havelis. According to the legend, Maharana Udai Singh, the founder was hunting one day when he met a holy man meditating on a hill overlooking the Lake Pichola. Maharana followed the advise of the hermit and founded the city. The marvellous architecture of the palaces is spell bounding.
 
General Information
Climate:Max.Min.
Summer 38.3 0C28.8 0C
Winter 28.3 0C 11.6 0C
Rainfall: 61 cms
Best Season:  October to March.
Clothing: Summer Tropical, Winter Woollen
 
TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION
 
Air: Well linked with major cities of India.
 
Rail: Well connected with major towns.
 
Ahmedabad- 262 km
Jaipur- 407 km
 Bombay- 739 km
Chittaurgarh- 115 km 
Delhi- 670 km
Mount Abu- 185 km. 
 
PLACES OF INTEREST
 
FORTS & MONUMENTS
 
 City Palace -- City Palace towers over the Pichola Lake. Maharana Uday Singh initiated in the construction of the palace but succeeding Maharanas added several palaces and structures to the complex retained a surprising uniformity to the design. The entry to the Palace is from the Hati Pol, the Elephant gate. The Bari Pol or the Big gate brings you to the Tripolia, the Triple gate. 
 
 
 Fateh Prakash Palace -- It"s like being cocooned in authentic royal luxury at the Fateh Prakash Palace, the grand heritage palace of the HRH group. The warmth of royal hospitality greets you as you walk along the corridors lined with large paintings of the Mewar school that flourished in the seventeenth through nineteenth century.
 
 
Crystal Gallery -- It is situated in the Fateh Prakash Palace is a breath taking collection of crystals. Maharana Sajjan Singh mainly ordered these crystals from F & C Osler England. But he could not see the crystals because of his untimely death.
 
 
 Durbar Hall -- In India the Durbar Hall is generally a place where state banquets are held and is also used for formal and informal meetings. The Durbar Hall at the Fateh Prakash Palace is undoubtedly the most lavish Durbar Hall in India. It is one of the grandest chambers in Udaipur and its sheer size makes one gasp in awe.
 
 
 The Lake Palace -- The Lake Palace is located on the Jag Niwas Island and covers the whole of 1.5 hectare of the island in the middle of the Pichola Lake. Built by Maharana Jagat Singh in 1743 it was meant as a royal summer palace and now converted in to a five star palace hotel. It is a magical palace and its image in the middle of the lake is like a leaf straight out of a fairy tale book with an excellent taste of intricate craftsmanship.
 
 
 Bagore-Ki Haveli -- This is a very congenial old building built right on the waterfront of Lake Pichola at Gangori Ghat. Amir Chand Badwa, the Prime Minister of Mewar built it in the eighteenth century. The palace has over hundred rooms and some very interesting display of costumes and modern art. The glass and mirror in the interiors of the Haveli delicate work and well preserved too. 
 
 
 Maharana Pratap Memorial (MOTI MAGARI) -- An impressive bronze statue of Maharana Pratap and his favorite and loyal horse, who was fiercely protective about his master and stood by him till his last breath, stands at the top of Moti Magri (Pearl Mount) overlooking Fateh Sagar. 
 
MUSEUMS 
 
 City museum -- The main part of the palace is now preserved as a museum displaying a large and diverse array of artefacts. Down steps from the entrance is the armoury museum exhibiting a huge collection of protective gear, weapons including the lethal two-pronged sword. The City Palace museum is then entered through the Ganesh Deori meaning the door of Lord Ganesh. This leads to the Rajya Angan, the royal courtyard that is the very spot where Maharana Udai Singh met the sage who told him to find a city here. 
 
 
 Shilpgram -- Literally meaning a "Craftsmen"s Village" is a living ethnographic museum depicting the enormous diversities in craft, art & culture between various Indian states, but the exquisite terracotta work mainly in dark red and dark brown sand material along with the wooden carvings are the forte of this ethnic village. 
 
 
 Ahar -- Located about 2 km east of Udaipur is an impressive cluster of cenotaphs of the Maharanas of Mewar. There are about nineteen cenotaphs of Maharanas cremated there. The most striking cenotaph is that Maharana Amar Singh, who reigned from 1597 to 1620. Nearby is also Ahar Museum, where on display is limited but very rare earthen pottery. 
 
 
 Vintage Collection of Classic Car -- The collection within the grounds of the Garden Hotel comprises a variety of classic and interestingly rare transportation vehicles; some stately and vintage like Cadalec, Chevalate, Morais etc., while the others are sleek and fast .The Maharanas of Udaipur once possessed and used these regal splendours of automobiles as their luxuries but most of the other models are gradually being added to the collection ,since it provides a unique aristocratic safari for the exclusive guests. Entry: Rs.80 TEMPLES 
 
 
 Jag mandir --This is the other island palace in Lake Pichola, which was constructed by Maharana Karan Singh as a hideout for Prince Khurram the estranged son of Emperor Jehangir the implacable foe of the Maharana. The reason for the aid was that the prince was the son of a Rajput mother.
 
 
 Jagdish Mandir -- Built by Maharana Jagat Singh I in 1651 the temple enshrines a black stone image of Lard Vishnu. There is a brass image of Garuda the Lord bird carrier. The exterior and the plinth are covered with base relief of alligators; elephants, horsemen and celestial musicians rise in tiers.
 
 
 PARKS & GARDENS 
 
 Sahelion Ki Bari -- Maharana Sangram singh builds this in the mid 18th century. The "garden of the maidens" brings to mind the lifestyle of the ladies of the court. The delightful gardens appear discreet and in impeccable taste. There are four pools with dainty kiosks, and all around are flowerbeds, lawns, pools and fountains protected by a series of walls and shady trees. The foundation of the Sahelion ki bari functions solely by water pressure and no pumps are used. 
 
 LAKES 
Lake Pichola -- Pichola Lake derives its name from Pichola Village was submerged and Maharana Udai Singh enlarged the lake after he founded the city. He built a masonry dam known as Badipol and lake is now 4 km long and 3 km wide. This picturesque lake encloses the Jag Niwas Island and the Jag Mandir. And, the City Palace extends along its eastern banks. 
 
 
 Boat trips10.00 am to 17.00 pm from Bansi Ghat Tariffs: 
 
 Fateh Sagar Lake -- This delightful lake, bordered by hills and woodland was constructed by Maharana jai Singh to the north of Lake Pichola. It is an artificial lake dug up in 1678, reconstructed by Maharana Fateh Singh A canal links the two, via Swaroop Sagar and Rang Sagar Lakes. The beautiful Nehru Island as well as an islet bearing a solar observatory rises from the lake. 
 
 
 Rajsamand Lake -- On the way to Kumbhalgarh lies their royal lake with a magnificent dam created in the 17th century offers a spectacular views of the sunset adorned by beautiful Torans [arches] and Chhatris And number of attractive pavilions. Stunning sculpture and Sanskrit verses are vividly inscribed in store a small counterpart of Nathdwara 
 
 
EXCURSIONS
 
 
 Kankroli 64- km - famous for the temple of Dwarkadheeshji.
 
 
 Eklingji 21 km -- A RELIGIOUS COMPLEX Northern region of Mewar (22 Km). It houses 108 temples chiselled out of sandstone and marble, this temple of Eklingji was built in 734 AD. Enclosed by high walls, it is devoted to Eklingji (A form of Shiv Deity adored under the epithet of EKLINGA). Built by Maharana Jagat Singh I in 1651 the temple enshrines a black stone image of Lard Vishnu. There is a brass image of Garuda the Lord bird carrier. The exterior and the plinth are covered with base relief of alligators; elephants, horsemen and celestial musicians rise in tiers. 
 
 
 Haldi Ghati- 42 km -- The extensive terra firma, towards the south west of Nathdwara, this historical site witnessed the great legendry battle fought between Maharana Pratap and the Mughal Emperor -Akbar in 1576 AD.
 
 
 Jaisamand Lake- 50 km -- Maharana Jai Sigh had built this picturesque artificial lake. It the second largest lake in Asia. The lake has elegant step leading to the water and marble Chhatri (cenotaphs) on its bank and a small Shiv temple marks the grace of the lake. On either side are the palaces built for the king favourite queens.
 
 
 Nathdwara- 42 km -- Nathdwara lies 48 km from Udaipur and literally means the gateway to the Lord. This great Vaishnavite shrine was built in the 17th century on spot exactly defined by the Lord himself. The legends have it that the image of the Lord Krishna was being transferred to safer place from Vrindaban to protect it from the destructive wrath of the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb. The image when it reached the spot it vehicle the bullock carts wheel sank axel deep in mud and refused to move further. The accompanying priest realised that this was lord"s chose spot and the image did not want to travel any further. Accordingly a Temple was built here.
 
 
 Ranakpur- 90 km -- Beautiful sculptured Jain temples mark the glory of this renowned place. Marked as one of the five holy places for the Jain community, these were created in the 15 the century. During the reign of Rana Kumbha and are enclosed within a wall. The central Chaumukha [four faced temple] is dedicated to Adinathji the temple is an astounding creation with 29 halls and 1,444 pillars all distinctly carved and no two being alike is an amazing evidence of the genius sense of architecture that enhances the charm of the place.
 
 
 Kumbhalgarh Fort 64 km -- Located north of Udaipur in the wilderness, Kumbhalgarh is the second most important citadel after Chittorgarh in the Mewar region. Cradled in the Aravali Ranges the fort was built in the 15th century by Rana Kumbha. Because of its inaccessibility and hostile topography the fort had remained un-conquered.
 
 
 Kumbhalgarh Sanctuary -- Is located in the most rugged of the Aravali in Pali, Rajsamand and Udaipur districts of Rajasthan. It takes name after the impressive historic fort of Kumbhalgarh, which come into view over the Park. It is 578 sq Km in area and at an altitude of 500 to 1,300m. It is home to a very large variety of wild life, some of which are highly endangered species. The wild life includes wolf, leopards, sloth bear, hyena, jackal, jungle cat, smabhar, nilgai, chaisingh (the four horned antelope), chinkara and hare.
 
 Sajjangarh -- High on a hilltop just outside Udaipur lies this dramatic 18th century palace, with a breathtaking view of the Mewar countryside Originally intended to be a towering five-story astronomical centre, it was later abandoned and used as a monsoon palace and hunting lodge. It was built by Maharana Sajjan Singh to house and observatory and was planned as a nineteen-storied structure.
 
 
 Ghanerao -- Is a small town famous for its castle now converted into a hotel. The castle"s highlight in the pavilion in the central court, where the musicians would perform. Also near the castle are the cenotaphs of former rulers. Mahavir Temple, a Jain Temple is also one of the highlights of the town

The city of Sawai Madhopur lies between the Aravali and Vindhya mountain ranges, within a landscape of hills and forests. The area is home to tiger reserves and one of the largest national parks in India. Go on a tiger safari and tour temples, palaces and an ancient defensive stronghold.

See why Sawai Madhopur is also known as Tiger City when you visit Ranthambore National Park. The vast wilderness is known for its tiger populations, but is also home to leopards, bears, crocodiles and many other species of animals. Take one of the 3-hour jeep rides that travel to several zones within the park where tigers can be seen in their natural habitat. Inside the park boundaries, find the Ranthambore Fort, a 10th-century stronghold that sits on top of a hill and covers an area of approximately 1.5 square miles (4 square kilometres). Walk on the huge stone walls and visit the fort’s temples, palaces and cenotaphs. 

If you want to see and photograph more tigers during your holiday, visit the tiger sanctuaries of Mansingh and Kailad Devi. Both are close to Ranthambore National Park.

Located just outside of Sawai Madhopur is the Rajiv Gandhi Regional Museum of Natural History. Tour exhibits that explore the relationships between plants and animals and watch a wildlife documentary in the eco theatre. See stuffed animals and the museum’s collection of preserved butterflies.

Also worth a visit is Shilpgram Sawai Madhopur, a craft village and ethnographic museum where you can learn about the lifestyles of local tribespeople and see handicraft and artwork being made.

Train travel is one of the simplest ways to get to Sawai Madhopur. The city has its own railway station that connects to major cities such as New Delhi, Jaipur and Kota. The nearest airport is Jaipur International Airport, located 95 miles (153 kilometres) away. 

Come to Sawai Madhopur to see its tigers, forests and ancient buildings.

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